Gallery: Fury and Fragility: A Sustainable Rebuilding Plan for the Town...

 

In Northern Japan, where the rugged coast meets pristine beaches, the town of Ishinomaki has long enjoyed the beauty and bounty of the surrounding sea. But benefit rarely comes without hazard and Ishinomaki was severely damaged by the 2011 tsunami. The foundation of the town’s rebuilding process will need to balance four primary goals: tsunami-resistance, sustainability, economic revitalization and social community. Fury and Fragility is a proposal for a tsunami-resistant regenerative design that will help rebuild this community while ensuring its sustainability.

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The most important factor in designing a tsunami-resistant city is safety. With this prime directive, the concept of “using nature to protect from nature” has evolved. Since there is no singular system that can adequately protect the community from a tsunami, a “multi-buffer system” or soft infrastructure is necessary. A multi-buffer system provides friction for the wave to pass through. The more friction the wave encounters, the more of its energy will be dissipated over a particular distance. These seven buffers include: the restoration of the previously existing sand dune, the restoration of a high-friction water edge, the creation of a canal (parallel to an incoming wave), the creation of an undulating and terracing seaside park, with tsunami-resistant vegetation, an elevation of 20-30 feet of the new development site, the radiation of the new urban plan to avoid direct penetration of the incoming wave and the creation of “green fingers” to provide for rapid evacuation routes.

This new sustainable community will be energy efficient, have its own district energy distribution center with a CHP component and allow for the elimination of nuclear energy dependence. The eco-district will be one where inhabitants and visitors not only see the landscape, but also “taste” the landscape. Adjacent gardens will allow local restaurants to grow their own vegetables. Both visitors and locals will be able to enjoy the memorial park. The water treatment facility will be rebuilt with MBR technology and seamlessly integrated into the park.

The new community will strongly encourage innovation, education, craft, tourism, research and development -based businesses. While environmental innovation will have a primary effect of job creation, these local jobs will have a secondary effect of allowing the younger generation to stay in Ishinomaki. As innovation will encourage tourism, tourism will encourage job growth and job growth will allow a self-sustaining Ishinomaki to prosper for many generations. The social community will benefit from green spaces, gardens, parks, smaller/walkable blocks and tree-lined streets, Such changes will encourage inhabitants to socialize with each other, resulting in a stronger, more educated community.

+ Fury and Fragility

The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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