Gallery: Green Design Predictions for 2013

2012 was a momentous year and we saw many significant changes, of both triumphs and failures. But as we embark upon this brand new year, we do so with optimism and hope that 2013 wil give rise to a better, more sustainable future. So now that the toasts have
 
2012 was a momentous year and we saw many significant changes, of both triumphs and failures. But as we embark upon this brand new year, we do so with optimism and hope that 2013 wil give rise to a better, more sustainable future. So now that the toasts have been made and Auld Lang Syne has come to a stop, we're turning to some of the world's leading environmental experts and design luminaries to offer us their predictions for 2013. Touching upon everything from climate change to technology to automotive, design and more, read on for what our eleven pundits envision for the coming year.

1. Bill McKibben — Environmentalist, President and Co-Founder of 350.org

2. David Assael & David Basulto — Co-founders of ArchDaily.com/The Plataforma Networks

3. Peter Weijmarshausen — CEO of Shapeways, 3D printing pioneer

4. Robert Ferry and Elizabeth Monoian — Founders of the Land Art Generator Initiative, Directors of Studied Impact Design

5. Todd J. Sanford, Ph.D. — Climate Scientist, Climate & Energy Program, Union of Concerned Scientists

6. Lloyd Alter — Designer, Editor at Treehugger

7. Jacob Louis Slevin — Founder and CEO of Designer Pages, Curator of Huffington Post Arts' Design Thursdays

8. Jean Lin — Editor-in-Chief at Designer Pages Media

9. Katie Fehrenbacher — Editor at Earth2Tech.com, Writer at GigaOM.com

10. Eric Corey Freed — Author, Founding Principal of organicARCHITECT

11. J Mays — Group Vice President of Global Design, Chief Creative Officer at Ford Motors

Did our experts’ predictions for 2012 hit or miss the mark? Read what they had to say about last year here.

Bill McKibben Environmentalist, Green Journalist, President and Co-Founder of 350.org

I think there’s actually a chance 2013 will be a significant year in climate history — the year when the planet’s leaders actually ran out of excuses for their inaction. We’re seeing record temperatures, record melting, record storms, record everything: it’s clearly not the same world we thought it was even a few years ago. But we’re also finally seeing record dissent. In the U.S. for instance, students on more than 190 campuses are fighting to demand the divestment of stocks in fossil fuel companies. They’ve peeled back the layers of the onion — they’re not demanding new lightbulbs, they’re demanding systemic changes in the balance of power, trying to weaken the forces of the radical status quo, the ones systematically altering the chemistry of the atmosphere.

It’s a hard fight, of course, because those forces are led by the richest industry on earth — the oil, coal, and gas tycoons. So I don’t predict the outcome. Only that the choice for the powerful is going to get harder almost by the week, if we keep building the movements we need to build. We’re not as powerful as Exxon yet, but we’re closer than we used to be, which is the only good news I can think of.

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2 Comments

  1. triffids January 8, 2013 at 1:54 pm

    I enjoyed the predictions but there is a huge component missing. There seem to be no predictions that include addressing the biggest green thing – the existing plants and biodiversity and design that includes enhancing or protecting this biodiversity. The closest to even mentioning the word plant is the prediction by Ferry and Monoian concerning pre-industrial (low energy) ideas. Perhaps 2013 will not see the recognition that all life needs plants and that is why this basic green sustainability component is not listed.

  2. report from the heartland January 3, 2013 at 2:11 pm

    Someone has to start evaluating everything by embodied energy and the impact on wildlife, plant and animal. A \”recycled\” material here, a bike there: nice, but unless we are made to pay the true cost of the way we live bye-bye birdies… and us.

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