Desalination is an important component of Singapore’s water supply – and the island country has a new desalination plant in the works decked out with green features. The large-scale facility can treat both freshwater and saltwater, and according to Today Online and other local news outlets, it’s thought to be the first one of its kind in the world.


Keppel Marina East Desalination Plant, Keppel Infrastructure, PUB, Singapore, desalination, desalination plant, desalination plants, large-scale dual-mode desalination plant, dual-mode desalination plant, seawater, saltwater, freshwater, water, drinking water, desalinated water, architecture, design, green roof

The Keppel Marina East Desalination Plant will be the first of its kind in Singapore, and some publications say in the world. It will be the country’s fourth desalination plant, but the first large-scale dual-mode one. It will treat water from the sea or the Marina Reservoir, depending on whether the weather is dry or wet. Keppel Infrastructure is constructing the plant under a 25-year Water Purchase Agreement with Singapore’s national water agency, PUB.

Related: Self-sustaining island eco-lodge in Florida has its own desalination system

Keppel Marina East Desalination Plant, Keppel Infrastructure, PUB, Singapore, desalination, desalination plant, desalination plants, large-scale dual-mode desalination plant, dual-mode desalination plant, seawater, saltwater, freshwater, water, drinking water, desalinated water, architecture, design, green roof

And this plant doesn’t look like your typical industrial facility. It will be topped with a 215,278 square foot green roof and equipped to harvest rainwater for irrigating plants. According to Keppel Infrastructure CEO Ong Tiong Guan, “…the plant’s design also blends seamlessly into the environment, allowing the public to enjoy the green space above the plant along with the surrounding greenery.” Treatment facilities will be underground in the plant PUB described as sleek and modern.

According to PUB Chief Executive Ng Joo Hee, desalination plants boost Singapore’s water security. He said in a statement, “As a source independent of weather, desalinated water is capable of strengthening our water supply resilience, especially against prolonged dry spells and droughts. We aim to triple its capacity to meet up to 30 percent of our water needs by 2060.”

The Keppel Marina East Desalination Plant is slated to be finished in 2020. The plant will produce around 30 million gallons of drinking water every single day.

Via PUB

Images via PUB