Gallery: Guilhem Eustache’s Bewitching Fobe House Captures Morocco’s En...

 
Double walls protect against solar gain

Originally, the Fobe House was going to be a lot larger than it is, but sustainability became a central concern so it was scaled right down. The vast acreage threatened to swallow up the minimalist structure, which is why steles were used to frame it. The home’s geometry helps to capture Morocco’s essence: light play, staircases that mimic narrow market alleyways, and of course the famous terraces enjoyed during cooler months.

The local materials employed in the building’s construction include clay and tadelakt, all locally sourced, and since Morocco gets very hot in the summer, double walls help to block some of the inevitable solar gain. No fewer than 500 trees that will eventually act as a carbon sink have been planted throughout the property – adding to the existing olive, palm, and eucalyptus. While nowhere near as dramatic as some of the craziest skyscrapers that we have featured, there’s definitely something magical about this beautiful home!

+ Guilhem Eustache

Via Yatzer

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