Gallery: INTERVIEW: Panasonic’s Haruyuki Ishio Gives Us the Inside Scoo...

INHABITAT: How many homes will be in the SST and what will the layout be like? Mr. Ishio: It will be about 1,000 households in size. The town layout is based on a leaf-like pattern, and it features three layers of construction (as shown in the renderings
 

INHABITAT: How many homes will be in the SST and what will the layout be like?

Mr. Ishio: It will be about 1,000 households in size. The town layout is based on a leaf-like pattern, and it features three layers of construction (as shown in the renderings we sent to you).

INHABITAT: The town will be built on the site of an old Panasonic factory? How did you decide on this location?

Mr. Ishio: Yes, Fujisawa SST will be built in the cleared site of a former Panasonic factory. As we mentioned in answer 2, Panasonic decided to build the sustainable smart town there after consulting with Fujisawa City officials.

INHABITAT: Can you tell us a little bit about Fujisawa SST and what Panasonic is hoping to accomplish with this new endeavor?

Mr. Ishio: From the business perspective, our Fujisawa Sustainable Smart Town plan is about Panasonic showing in a very visible way the company’s comprehensive solutions capabilities (for private homes, multi-family dwellings and facilities) in a real town setting, while establishing new business models for our energy solutions businesses.

INHABITAT: When and why did Panasonic decide to create the smart town? Was it related to the disasters of last year?

Mr. Ishio: In the beginning of 2007, Panasonic started to consult with Fujisawa City about how Panasonic could utilize the vacant land after we stopped production in our plants there. Fujisawa City focused on being an “Ecology-Oriented Town” in its city development strategy, while Panasonic has set its focus on becoming the “Number 1 Green Innovations Company in the Electronics Industry by 2018″. With similar overall aims in mind, Fujisawa City and Panasonic agreed to use the cleared land to contribute to society in terms of ecology.

Fujisawa SST was planned before the massive earthquake that hit Japan on March 11, 2011, so the earthquake damage was not the direct reason for Panasonic to start this project. But the earthquake put the Fujisawa SST project into sharper perspective, making it evident how much safer and more sustainable such a community could be in an emergency.

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


1 Comment

  1. SANUDIYA WILLIE December 10, 2011 at 4:09 am

    it’s interesting to here such information which leads to sustainable development.

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
Federated Media Publishing - Home