earthquake-resistant architecture in Japan, Kengo Kuma architecture, Greenbiz architecture, Greenbiz by Komatsu Seiren, CABKOMA Strand Rod by Komatsu Seiren, carbon fiber strands, earthquake-resistant carbon fiber, Komatsu Seiren Fabric laboratory fa-bo by Kengo Kuma

Formerly a nondescript boxy building, the 2,874-square-meter Komatsu Seiren Fabric laboratory fa-bo now draws the eye with its turfed roof and sculptural facade. The carbon-fiber strands, created by the client company, are made up of a thermoplastic carbon fiber composite called CABKOMA Strand Rod that’s considered the lightest seismic reinforcement in the world. The material’s high tensile strength and flexibility makes the rods “ten times stronger than iron,” write the architects. “This is the very first time that this material was used as a means of reinforcement against earthquakes.” Gaps left between the strands demarcate building entrances.

earthquake-resistant architecture in Japan, Kengo Kuma architecture, Greenbiz architecture, Greenbiz by Komatsu Seiren, CABKOMA Strand Rod by Komatsu Seiren, carbon fiber strands, earthquake-resistant carbon fiber, Komatsu Seiren Fabric laboratory fa-bo by Kengo Kuma

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The lightweight carbon fiber composites can also be found in the interior, which feature white draped fabrics that mimic the sculptural facade. The green roof is topped with another Komatsu Seiren product called Greenbiz, porous and spongy ceramic panels made from waste material in carbon fiber production.

+ Kengo Kuma and Associates

Via Dezeen

Images via Kengo Kuma and Associates