What if you could build your own arm using LEGO bricks? An innovative prosthetic arm that allows children to incorporate their own personalized LEGO attachments could make that dream a reality. The idea, which took home the Grand Prix award at Paris’s Netexplo digital technology summit, is known as the IKO Creative Prosthetic System. Due to its adaptability, the unique prosthetic can suit a range of preferences for shapes, colors, and accessories, bringing empowerment and creativity to children with disabilities.


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Colombian born Torres told the BBC that “As a Colombian, you grow up with the arms conflict and we are so aware of people losing limbs or having difficulties because of war.” He hopes to help disabled children embrace their disabilities through technology and imagination.

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Torres is working to secure investment for development of the prosthetic this year. He estimates that it will sell for approximately $5,000 with an additional $1,000 fee for each 3D-printed replacement socket required as the wearer grows. The growing popularity of 3D printing will continue to drive costs down and make prosthetics more affordable and easier for children to maintain.

Designed by former Lego intern Carlos Torres, the concept competed with entries from across the globe, including a Japanese robot, which scored highly enough on school exams to be admitted to the University of Tokyo, and an app designed to translate all 11 of South Africa’s official languages.

Via BBC, Phys.org

Images via Netexplo