Gallery: LifeCycle Tower in Austria Will Be World’s Tallest Wooden Buil...

 
Even the Passivehaus stardard windows use wooden frames.

The core of the prefab system is a wooden post and beam construction that supports a concrete slab. The utilities and elevator core of the building can be made from either concrete or wood. The exterior shell is engineered to maximize the walls’ r-value and reduce thermal bridging. The system has the potential to qualify for the Passivhaus standards which supports, and in fact encourages, larger buildings.

The design is based on a 1.3 meter grid, and can be used for hotels, offices, apartments, or other needs. The façade utilizes a panelized system which can be manipulated for the client’s aesthetic preferences and supports a number of technologies. These include a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPVs) system, green wall system, solar thermal panels or a second glazing curtain. Systems integration help make best use of energy resources like solar, biomass boilers and passive cooling thanks to the operable windows.

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4 Comments

  1. shlarkin November 18, 2010 at 11:28 am

    Does Austria use the International Construction Codes? As such, wouldn\’t this be Type IV construction which limited between 3 and 5 stories dependant upon Use Group?

  2. Kishore Bhattacharya November 18, 2010 at 8:17 am

    Surely the designers have done ‘thinking out of the box’–as both initial and lifecycle carbon foot print are addressed.

    (1)I shall be eager to know how ‘wood’ is allowed to be used when everyone is screaming to save forests in the quest for environmental protection . How this factor was addressed?
    (2) Is bamboo used in any item? Bamboo has lately come into picture for its quick replenishment and low water need.
    (3)According to my calculations, building energy efficiency is solely dependent on its envelope/facade.All the remaining quantum are attributable to occupants, directly or indirectly.Even the outdoor air needed is occupant driven. Therefore a strict guideline on occupant consumption becomes essential. Any such measures taken for this building?
    I shall be very happy to hear from the authorities on my curiosity.

  3. Niklas Gfrerer November 15, 2010 at 7:47 am

    Dear ifmann,

    As a member of the Cree Team i comment your statement as follows:
    “…There is much more to this story to be reported……much of which could impact sustainability “scoring”.

    “Of key interest is how this proposed building is designed to resist lateral forces……from wind and earthquake. Weight of concrete floors is most likely necessary to resist wind. However, weight of concrete will be a problem in the event of seismic shaking. Plan dimensions may have to be relatively large compared to height to minimize vertical resistance forces.”

    We should be aware that we are talking about a system. Of course individual requirements have to be considered. In case of our recent research project all necessary performances for resistance against wind and earthquake have been proved properly for a twenty storey building at the location Bregenz, Austria. If anyone is interested in the documentation please feel free to get into contact with us.

    “For column spacings typically found in modern buildings, height between floors most likely must be greater than for steel or concrete framing due to much greater required depth of wood floor framing members. The alternative would be many more columns to reduce span lengths of floor members.”

    That’s one of the reasons why we invented composite slab instead of a slab made completely out of timber. Furthermore we integrate technical installations in the slab structure – in fact the total height of a storey in our building is lower than in comparable buildings with conventional reinforced concrete structures.

    Issues relative to fire resistance must be quite challenging as well…”

    Of course they are. This is subject to further development of our system.

  4. jfmann November 10, 2010 at 1:07 pm

    There is much more to this story to be reported……much of which could impact sustainability “scoring”.

    Of key interest is how this proposed building is designed to resist lateral forces……from wind and earthquake. Weight of concrete floors is most likely necessary to resist wind. However, weight of concrete will be a problem in the event of seismic shaking. Plan dimensions may have to be relatively large compared to height to minimize vertical resistance forces.

    For column spacings typically found in modern buildings, height between floors most likely must be greater than for steel or concrete framing due to much greater required depth of wood floor framing members. The alternative would be many more columns to reduce span lengths of floor members.

    Issues relative to fire resistance must be quite challenging as well.

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