Gallery: Low Impact Apollo 11 House Lands Silently In the Forest As A Q...

 
Built to have minimal impact on the forest, the home is merely an observation point and in theory could easily be removed without leaving a trace.

The home is organized on two levels with 6 x 9 meter floors, each 6 meters high. This rectangular shape was inspired by Japanese architecture and based on the theory that rectangles are the only element that disappear in nature. The grid structure is constructed of metal plates with the spaces filled with either glass or wood. The forest space ship serves as an architecture workshop, recording studio and rehearsal room for acoustic and electric music.

The north facade is fully glass and takes in the heat during the winter months when the trees are without leaves. Thermal energy is stored on both floors to help keep the home a constant temperature. In the summer, the trees are bursting with leaves and provide shade for the home. Meanwhile the south side of the home features both wood and glass panels to retain heat, but the facades can be changed throughout the year depending on what the forest is doing. Built to have minimal impact on the forest, the home is merely an observation point and in theory could easily be removed without leaving a trace.

+ Parra + Edwards Arquitectos

Via Plataforma Arquitectura

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7 Comments

  1. owen66 July 29, 2011 at 8:32 am

    i dont think anyone is criticizing the design (at least i was not). but to have it presented as this thing that “landed in the forest as a quiet observer” and it could “leave with no trace” is what i have a problem with. construction is inherently and always a violent act against a virgin habitat. lebbeus woods has a lot of writing on architecture and politics and its impact on the environment. he makes the statement “Architecture is War” in one of the Pamphlet Architecture books – an interesting read. don’t get me wrong, i’m all for architecture and design (it’s actually what my degree is in) but i have a problem with it being presented as something it’s not. look at what it means to build.

  2. allenmueller July 28, 2011 at 12:59 pm

    I’m earingmarking this as one of my favorite forest dwellings ever. So many perfect details built into one place!

  3. allenmueller July 28, 2011 at 12:56 pm

    Wow, this is a great article with some of the lamest comments I’ve ever read. Maybe the designer needs to show us his birth certificate before we consider the legitimacy of this design…

  4. owen66 July 23, 2011 at 11:15 am

    portraying architecture in this light really irks me. new construction is very resource intensive. if you want low impact, renovate an un-used building in an urban environment. lazy is right, the water/electric had to be run somehow. i wonder how much was ripped out, torn down or cleared out and then put back.

  5. Helman700 July 22, 2011 at 5:02 pm

    They also let half their landing craft behind, and on later missions cars as well. Lazyreader is exactly right. It’s aptly named to fool you into believing that it’s low impact. A box on non-permanent stilts with self-contained water, sewage and power. Built from renewable site harvested resources can be moved without a trace, not this building.

  6. lazyreader July 22, 2011 at 1:18 pm

    The astronauts from the Apollo missions were certainly not low impact. They took nearly a thousand pounds of moon rock and left their poop behind. I doubt this house is any different. How do they get water or flush waste without pipes or plumbing having needed to be built underground. If you build a house in the middle of no where, you should buy some land neighboring around it so no one can imitate you. All of a sudden the quiet disappears and so do the animals.

  7. daniellagaia July 22, 2011 at 1:09 pm

    i loved that house. I would like this project to follow to build one for me. i would like to include stones in the base maybe..

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