Gallery: Oakland’s Stunning LEED Platinum Margarido House

 

Mike McDonald and his wife Dr. Jill Martenson decided to build their home on a steep lot ravaged by a fire in the Oakland hills back in 1991. The 4600 sq ft Margarido House is by no means a small home, but with the addition of a plethora of green building features it will become the first LEED-H Platinum certified home in Northern California. It will also be GreenPoint rated, which is a separate third party rating system administered by Build It Green. The Margarido House will feature almost every green strategy you can imagine and will be 55% more efficient than California’s Title 24 energy standards.

The house is both beautiful and very functional, making brilliant use of outside light and solar power. Its construction incorporates a variety of sustainable and fire resistant materials, and all of its poured concrete contains 25% fly ash. The interiors feature LED lighting, smart house automation, locally sourced products, and recycled concrete and glass countertops. A planted roof garden and deck top off the project, and the house is site-sensitve, featuring permeable paving, rain and ground water reclamation, and drought tolerant landscaping and plants.

All of these strategies and more add up to the Margarido Residence‘s LEED Platinum certification. But what is even more interesting is that McDonald and his team actually lost points in the LEED rating system for having such a large house to begin with.

McDonald’s mantra for his home was “green can be beautiful and sexy,”and this is clearly seen in the design of the house. Whether or not you can agree with the size of the home, they built it as green as they could and in an urban infill lot. To be certified as LEED Platinum you need 102 points. The Margarido House has 118.

Photo Credit: Melissa Kaseman, Mike McDonald, McNichols, Paul Ivey

+ Margarido House

+ 2008 Architecture and the City Festival

Via Jetson Green

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7 Comments

  1. OJA October 24, 2010 at 4:23 pm

    My real estate agent forwarded the following:

    “The Margarido house came on the market 10/23/09 for $5.5 million.

    It was reduced in February to $4,795,000.

    It expired May 16 and has just been relisted for $4,500,000.”

    As of today, late 2010 I checked the new listing agent’s website and it has been dropped to $3,950,000.

    My agent had a new home listed nearby that was 6,000 sf. with sweeping Bay views listed at $2 million and had very few showings, and it’s price has been dropped to $1.8 million.

    I have been through the house – some of the design features are stunning but there is not much land for the $ and the amount of stairs is numbing. Getting to the roof deck garden takes courage and no fear of heights. I cut my hand grabbing hard-edged stainless steel railings and got chills looking down to open gratings to the ground 2 or 3 stories below – imagine doing that after a couple of Martinis.

    Environmental consciousness and high design meet the realities of the marketplace and the ebbs and flows of the economy.

  2. cesarpatricio November 6, 2008 at 12:44 pm

    Really awesome,

  3. Graiggy.S September 7, 2008 at 9:57 pm

    “The house is both beautiful and very functional,”
    These words from the article describe where you will find the fundamental difference between this gorgeous home and the Living Homes designs witch it resembles or for most of the modern prefab designs.In The Margarido House you have rooms with “real” walls that provides privacy inside any of it’s rooms that you do not seem to have from what i have seen out of the Living Homes design,witch have very thin walls and a sliding door as a mean to form a room.
    CONGRATULATIONS to Mr.McDonald and his wife for a job well done!!
    Roccio Romero you got a challenge!!
    Are the plans for this MASTERPIECE of a home available for sale?

  4. BlueBerry September 6, 2008 at 4:42 pm

    I really like it. I agree it’s a big house but it beats a Mac-Mansion any day of the year.

  5. jeanX September 4, 2008 at 8:01 pm

    This area of CA does not require central heat or a/c.
    I agree with the 1st poster’s comments.

  6. alisamleo September 3, 2008 at 3:00 pm

    absolutely awesome

  7. PISTABACI September 3, 2008 at 2:18 pm

    IT’S BEAUTIFUL, BUT EVEN WITH ALL THE ENERGY SAVINGS AND OTHER “GREEN” FEATURES, WHY ARE WE STILL CALLING A 4600SF SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE “SUSTAINABLE”? IF EVERYONE ON THE PLANET LIVED IN A HOUSE LIKE THIS, … WELL, YOU CAN’T HAVE EVERYONE LIVING IN A HOUSE LIKE THIS. SO WHAT’S SUSTAINABLE ABOUT THIS KIND OF LIFESTYLE?

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