Architecture firm Waugh Thistleton designed an office block in London’s Shoreditch district meant to be built entirely out of wood. Five vertical slices separated by deep voids within the floor plates will be constructed using glulam and cross-laminated timber. When its completed, the nine-story office building will be among the tallest modern timber-framed structures in the British capital.


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The design will allow for flexible tenancy, which will make the building suitable for a single renter or offer spaces that can be divided into smaller areas. The 90,000-square-foot building has a series of vertical cuts, separating it into five distinct sections to provide versatility for internal layouts and open plan floor plates. These cuts also allow natural light to penetrate the center of the structure – an amenity garden accessible on multiple levels. These garden spaces would provide informal meeting areas, as well as a natural green environment.

Related: Bordeaux’ Canopia tower will be one of the tallest timber frame structures in the world

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The building will bring together two types of engineered wood: glued laminated timber (glulam), and cross-laminated timber, known as CLT. “Building in timber offers a number of advantages, including minimised time on site, and associated sound and waste disturbance,” explained Waugh Thistleton director Andrew Waugh. “This translates to less impact on adjacent occupiers, street users and surrounding community.”

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The firm previously designed the UK’s first CLT building and the famous Murray Grove residential block, continuing to embrace what the architecture community calls “the new concrete.”

+ Waugh Thistleton

Via Dezeen

Renderings by ForbesMassie