The Seasteading Institute is on target to launch the world’s first floating city by 2020. The Floating City Project is set to have political autonomy, although the concept involves an integrated relationship with a “host nation.” The self-sufficient floating community is planned to have residences, tourism, aquaculture, a business park, a research institute, and a power plant to sell energy and clean water back to the host nation.

The institute’s architectural design contest closed June 1, and now the development team has announced the Floating City Project has graduated to Phase II. The first phase involved a feasibility report, crowdfunding $27,000 toward the design, and identifying potential customers. The team has also explored several different designs, including those from Dutch aquatic design firm DeltaSync and other alternatives. DeltaSync’s vision was selected as the most viable option, which is comprised of modular platforms in either squares or pentagons. According to the concept, the floating platforms can be connected and arranged in numerous branch-like structures. The actual design of the floating city remains to be seen, following the forthcoming announcement of the design contest winner.

Related: Scotland will soon be home to the world’s first self-sufficient island

The team is now considering possible locations for the floating community, and closed out 2014 by taking a group of architects and engineers to an “undisclosed location” for research. There have been no public statements about where the future city might end up being constructed, or what nation will become its “host.”

Moving forward into Phase II will bring new challenges, but the backers are pushing forward. The team has conducted extensive research on the project thus far, including identifying “potential residents from 67 countries and many income levels [who] provided extensive feedback,” according to the company’s website, which seems to indicate a strong public backing for this unique endeavor.

+ Floating City Project

Via Archinet

Images via Seasteading