Gallery: STUART HAYGARTH’S TIDE CHANDELIER

 

London-based designer Stuart Haygarth knows now to turn mass amounts of trash into awe-inspiring treasure. With training in design and photography, Haygarth conceived of the Tide Chandelier while collecting debris that had washed up on the shores of the Kent coastline. The enormous light fixture, measuring nearly five feet in diameter, is composed of a cornucopia of clear plastic refuse, from water bottles to sunglasses.

The Tide Chandelier gets is name from its spherical shape, a reference to the moon, whose tidal pull creates the waves that wash up the debris. The mass of plastic objects hangs delicately from monofilament lines suspended from above by a wooden “platform.” Haygarth’s lighting designs are inspired by collections of “banal and overlooked” objects, which, when amassed in large quantities in clever arrangements, take on a new beauty and stunning visual impact.

Tide Chandelier in an edition of ten, price upon request.

+ Stuart Haygarth

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19 Comments

  1. SunnyjHolsteins April 21, 2009 at 9:38 am

    i love this piece, it’s so intrecate, but beautifully put together! well done

  2. SunnyjHolsteins April 21, 2009 at 9:36 am

    I ♥ Mich K

  3. SunnyjHolsteins April 21, 2009 at 9:35 am

    This is a BEAUTIFUL peice of work!!
    I ♥ Mich Koobie

  4. avize November 7, 2008 at 11:40 am

    Great,
    Thx for information….

  5. Kat October 21, 2007 at 11:19 am

    garbage has never looked so good! the litterers where he’s from discard some pretty colorful stuff. you’d always be noticing new things. could get downright distracting at the dinner table.

  6. Inhabitat » TRASH... September 22, 2007 at 3:57 am

    [...] Stuart Haygarth transforms found objects into luxe products. Our favorite: his Optical Chandelier made from unwanted glass lenses. [...]

  7. Inhabitat » DEPTF... September 17, 2007 at 6:35 pm

    [...] Challenge until 25th September. Twenty-six international designers, including Conran and Partners, Stuart Haygarth, Martí Guixé, and Based Upon, were invited to redesign discarded objects from Deptford Thrift [...]

  8. Lined & Unlined &ra... August 6, 2007 at 12:02 pm

    [...] 174. Apartment Therapy pointed me to Stuart Haygarth’s lovely Tide Chandelier. [...]

  9. Assel Nurkhaidarova June 29, 2007 at 11:19 am

    It’s just fantatic!

  10. Whippleworld » Bl... May 5, 2007 at 8:24 pm

    [...] into awe-inspiring treasure. With training in design and photography, Haygarth conceived of the Tide Chandelier while collecting debris that had washed up on the shores of the Kent coastline. The enormous light [...]

  11. Ally February 6, 2007 at 9:02 pm

    This is by far the coolest chandelier I have ever seen.

  12. Emma Beddard January 25, 2007 at 11:11 am

    I love this, I was lucky enough to see one in the show designersblock last year. Sadly I think he only made about 10, all of which have been sold and were (of course) completely unique.

    This year he had made these coloured lightboxes, each one colour and filled with various glass objects artfully arranged.

  13. Megan Schembri January 22, 2007 at 8:07 pm

    Hi I love this, How much is it and has it got energy efficent light bulb in it?

    Thanks
    Megan

  14. MP January 20, 2007 at 2:08 pm

    This reminds me of an installation I saw in Buenos Aires. It was a bunch of garbage set in resin and shaped to look like the continents. It looked like ice and it was meant to look like it was melting. Very cool and very smart. The rest of it was related to this idea of the planet melting as well. I thought it was pretty innovative.

  15. Maggie van Rooyen January 19, 2007 at 4:29 pm

    Fantastic. I really enjoyed looking at the chandelier. It would be a great conversation piece in any living room.

  16. The Chandelier Blog &ra... January 19, 2007 at 11:37 am

    [...] Inhabitat: London-based designer Stuart Haygarth knows now to turn mass amounts of trash into awe-inspiring treasure. With training in design and photography, Haygarth conceived of the Tide Chandelier while collecting debris that had washed up on the shores of the Kent coastline. The enormous light fixture, measuring nearly 5 feet in diameter, is composed of a cornucopia of clear plastic refuse, from water bottles to sunglasses. [...]

  17. Nicky Chang January 19, 2007 at 6:45 am

    nice. wonder how the shadow will play out. :)

  18. Janis January 18, 2007 at 3:08 pm

    Hey, I love this chandelier! How much do you sell it for?
    thanks!
    Janis

  19. Susan Piperato January 18, 2007 at 11:12 am

    Hello, I am interested in possibly featuring this in our magazine, New York House, which focuses on green living and green building in NY City and the Hudson Valley. Could you send more information and digital images at 300 dpi or higher? Thank you!

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