Mike Chino

The Strata: World's First Skyscraper With Built-In Wind Turbines

by , 03/15/10

strata tower, sustainable design, green building, green design, the razor, london, uk, world's first wind turbine skyscraper, renewable energy, sustainable architecture

According to The Guardian, each of the building’s 19KW turbines will have 5 blades rather than 3, which will reduce noise during operation. Meanwhile a five-ton base outfitted with vibration dampers will keep the building securely anchored to the earth. The skyscraper will also boast other green building strategies such as the exclusive use of natural ventilation, high-performance glazing, and other energy efficiency measures that will keep the building’s power use 6% below current building requirements.

The Strata tower cost £113 million and is set to complete construction this April. The skyscraper’s revolutionary design makes bold steps towards meeting the UK’s requirement that all new buildings be zero-carbon by the year 2019.

+ Strata

Via The Guardian UK

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15 Comments

  1. Harriet N December 5, 2011 at 12:03 pm

    Eco friendly credentials are all very well but surely building a 42 storey tower constructed mainly from concrete and glass defeats the object of being ‘green’. I feel that the wind turbines are a complete fad and living in the area I have only seen the turbines actually moving on one occasion. I wonder whether the Architects and Engineers actually thought they’d work or whether designing them into the scheme just improved their chance of planning and approval from the community…

  2. Aliyu Abdullahi Sulaiman September 22, 2010 at 7:34 am

    Interesting, we should concentrate more on building structures that are environmental friendly all over the world.

  3. Tim Asquith July 1, 2010 at 3:12 pm

    I take it that if they require to move the building in the future. They just add wings and change the turbines to fans.

    The trouble long mains lead.

    Great idea.

  4. anjibabu July 1, 2010 at 3:02 am

    hi,very nice devolepment

  5. Arnel Martinez June 29, 2010 at 8:35 pm

    Great feats of engineering mixed with “green” ideas are definitely good. It does not matter who was the first, every bit of effort counts. But how about the materials and processes involved in getting this wonderful structures up, have they also gone “green”?

  6. shintaro June 29, 2010 at 6:48 pm

    What’s the noise pollution of these turbines??

  7. azaro666 June 29, 2010 at 6:11 pm

    I think you have all missed the line at the beginning of the article which states “We’ve seen skyscrapers studded with wind turbines before, but the Strata is the first building to integrate turbines directly into its facade”.
    It even has a link to the Bahrain World Trade Centre.
    This is actually part of the buildings structure as opposed to being placed between two parts of the building.

  8. jvinson June 29, 2010 at 5:01 pm

    The 3 turbines in Bahrain’s World Trade Center were installed March 2006, and became operational some months after this. J. Vinson

  9. PeteTheB June 29, 2010 at 12:12 pm

    Hmmm,.. Britain hasn’t managed to be first at anything for years and this is most definitely not a first! The UK has a very poor attitude to renewable energy. Planning consent for even small projects is seldom given so it’s nice to see at least one slipping through! I tried to get solar heating installed,.. and was told “.. not possible in a national park area.” (So more pylons are OK then?)

  10. John Bauer March 21, 2010 at 6:53 pm

    “that is heralded as the world’s first building with wind turbines”

    Nope, not the first. Not sure what the first building would be, but here is one in Portland, Oregon with an article date of August, 2009, which would best this building by nearly a year.

    http://blog.indigo12west.com/2009/08/up-go-the-turbines/

    http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=13065

  11. Anders Elmqvist March 19, 2010 at 5:36 am

    Given that 8% of the building’s energy consumption seems to be 50 MWh, the building as a whole consumes 575 MWh/year. I guess that’s better than consuming 625 MWh/year.

  12. davidwayneosedach March 18, 2010 at 8:21 pm

    Beautiful structure! I’ll make a point of seeing it when I visit London. I wonder how much electricity it generates?

  13. AJ March 18, 2010 at 5:22 pm

    To echo what gktozer said- this is NOT the “first” skyscraper with integrated wind turbines- that honor goes to the Bahrain World Trade Center. BWTC stands over 300 meters talls- twice the height of the Razor

  14. gktozer March 18, 2010 at 2:19 pm

    While perhaps new for London, how about the World Trade Center in Bahrain? It’s had turbines for a while now and can produce up to 1300 mwh per year.
    http://bahrainwtc.com/

  15. davidosomething March 15, 2010 at 6:53 pm
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