Andrew Michler

Zoka Zola's Naturally Cooled Bamboo Hostel is a Giant Wind Scoop

by , 05/23/11

Arup green building, Zoka Zola, natural cooling, passive cooling, Hong Kong green building, green hostel, wind scoop, low CO2 building, natural ventilation architecture,

Humans are kept comfortable not only by cooled air but by moving air which draws heat off our skin. In fact natural breezes provide comfort in rooms that are much warmer than typically tolerated.

By carefully incorporating the natural wind patterns of the site the building is designed to accommodate the changing wind conditions. The aggressive flared roofline on either side of the building efficiently captures the moving air– which is then transferred throughout the second floor using large plenums. The air exits out again through an open grid floor to the open space below. During the day southerly breezes come from the ocean and in the evening cool northerly winds come down the forested slope and wash across the building. The roof also acts as a buffer from solar gain. Sunlight will be carefully controlled to bring in diffused lighting while avoiding direct solar heat.

The building is made mostly from bamboo, an indigenous grass to Southern China and a excellent building material. The copious use of the traditional building material is intended to help bring bamboo back as a contemporary choice in low rise buildings. Furniture and finishes will also be made from the versatile grass.

+ Zoka Zola Architects

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2 Comments

  1. shabeik May 18, 2012 at 10:40 am

    it’s a wellcome development. i believe this will get international approval. meanwhile, can you design two bedroom apartment for me, including the construction?

  2. anothervoice May 24, 2011 at 1:56 pm

    This is a pretty seductive building. Aesthetically interesting and approachable with the trebled value that comes from being beautiful, sustainable and efficient.

    I would not be surprised to see this building receive recognition from the international architectural community. It’s a new benchmark in sustainable design to my eyes.

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