We humans have done a pretty good job of trashing the Earth all by ourselves, but we don’t often stop to consider external threats – like asteroids. A 1908 asteroid explosion over Tunguska, Siberia ravaged 800 square miles, and Queen’s University Belfast astrophysicist Alan Fitzsimmons said another asteroid collision is simply a matter of time, which could have devastating consequences if we remain unprepared. He said most of us don’t think about asteroids as a threat to our existence.


Asteroid, asteroids, asteroid strike, asteroid collision, asteroid collisions, Near-Earth Asteroid, Near-Earth Asteroids, Asteroid Day, meteor, meteors, space, science

We now remember the day of the 1908 asteroid strike as Asteroid Day. It’s June 30, and Fitzsimmons is joining other experts like physicist Brian Cox and International Space Station astronaut Nicole Stott to call attention to the threat. Fitzsimmons says it’s not a matter of if an asteroid will impact the Earth, but when. He said a strike like the Tunguska one today could demolish a mayor city – and a larger asteroid strike could be even more devastating.

Related: NASA rolls out new asteroid detection program to defend Earth from destructive meteors

Fitzsimmons said in a statement, “Astronomers find Near-Earth Asteroids every day and most are harmless. But it is still possible the next Tunguska would take us by surprise, and although we are much better at finding larger asteroids, that does us no good if we are not prepared to do something about them.”

Asteroid, asteroids, asteroid strike, asteroid collision, asteroid collisions, Near-Earth Asteroid, Near-Earth Asteroids, Asteroid Day, meteor, meteors, space, science

He said experts have gotten much better about detecting Near-Earth Asteroids, and have found more than 1,800 objects that could be potentially hazardous. But there are more out there – and we need to be prepared. Fitzsimmons is part of a European Research Council-funded project, NEOshield-2, whose mission is to figure out how to deflect the hazardous asteroids.

Asteroid Day events will be live streamed here. There will be conversations with space agencies like NASA and a Neil deGrasse Tyson-narrated video series on scientists laboring to protect Earth from asteroids, to name a few. The organization says it will be the first 24-hour live broadcast about space ever.

Via Queen’s University Belfast

Images via Asteroid Day