Climate change is often connected to heat waves and hot temperatures. But researchers recently found very different weather patterns could arise in a dry region of Africa: the Sahel. The area sprawls across multiple countries and is considered a transitional zone between the Sahara Desert and more humid regions to the south, and itself is prone to extreme dryness. But climate change could trigger a regular monsoon in the region.


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The Sahel stretches from the Atlantic Ocean eastward into Sudan. According to Encyclopædia Britannica, eight months of the year at minimum are dry, and the wet season only sees around four to eight inches of rain. But all that could change if temperatures raise past 1.5 to two degrees Celsius, according to Jacob Schewe of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and Anders Levermann of Potsdam University and Columbia University.

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Dozens of computer simulations show this region of the world could get wetter under climate change, and the scientists scrutinized the simulations showing the greatest increase. They identified a self-amplifying mechanism that could intensify what Schewe called the Sahel monsoon as more water evaporates from hotter oceans and then falls on land.

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Regions which are nearly part of the Sahara Desert in Mali, Chad, and Niger could see as much rain as central Nigeria or northern Cameroon receive today. Rainfall could offer benefits for the Sahel, but the two researchers say adapting to the altered weather could be difficult for the region, some areas of which have been grappling with instability and war.

In a statement, Levermann said, “…the Sahel might experience years of hard-to-handle variability between drought and flood. Obviously, agriculture and infrastructure will have to meet this challenge. As great as it hopefully were for the dry Sahel to have so much more rain, the dimension of the change calls for urgent attention.”

The journal Earth System Dynamics published the research online earlier this month.

Via the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research

Images via Ammar Hassan on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons