We already knew dogs are saviors to humankind – but it turns out they are heroes to other species as well! Recently a golden retriever named Storm rescued a baby deer from drowning off the coast of Long Island, New York. The dramatic ordeal was captured on video and has since gone viral – check it out below.

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This past weekend, Storm was out for a walk with his caretaker Mark Freeley when he “plunged into the water and started swimming out to the fawn, grabbed it by the neck and started swimming to shore,” according to CBS New York.

In the video, Freeley can be heard saying, “Storm is trying to save this baby deer — I think he’s trying to save him.” Upon realizing that Storm was, in fact, saving the 3-month-old fawn’s life, Freeley started offering words of encouragement to the dog. “Storm, bring him in! Storm, bring him in! Good boy, Storm, bring him in!” he yelled.

The golden retriever dragged the dog to the beach, where it immediately stood up, scurried away, then collapsed. This prompted Storm to chase after it — again. Freeley encouraged Storm to leave the fawn alone as the dog nudged its body and pawed its leg.

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After receiving a call, Frank Floridia with the Strong Island Animal Rescue League rushed to the beach. There, he found the fawn “completely disoriented.” Out of distress, it rushed into the water again. Erica Kutzing, the animal rescue’s co-founder, told The Washington Post: “They tried to encourage Storm to go back into the water, but the deer was so far out that Storm could not see the deer.” Once they saw the deer’s head was underwater, Floridia jumped into the water to rescue the animal. According to the activist, “It was a do-or-die situation.” Fortunately, the deer made it.

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According to Kutzing, deer can swim – even in the Long Island Sound – but it’s likely the fawn was spooked and too young to be able to survive in the water. Fortunately for the animal, Storm was nearby to save its life and alert humans to its struggle.

Via The Washington Post

Images via Mark Freeley