MAD Architects just officially broke ground on the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in Los Angeles’ Exposition Park – and new renderings show the spaceship-like building in all its glory. Founded by “Star Wars” creator George Lucas, the museum will take on a fittingly futuristic appearance crafted in MAD Architects’ iconic curvaceous style. The $1.5 billion museum is expected to be complete and open to the public by the second half of 2021.

Lucas Museum of Narrative Art by MAD Architects, George Lucas museum, Lucas Museum in Los Angeles, Lucas Museum groundbreaking, Lucas Museum architects, Los Angeles Exposition Park museum,

Lucas Museum of Narrative Art by MAD Architects, George Lucas museum, Lucas Museum in Los Angeles, Lucas Museum groundbreaking, Lucas Museum architects, Los Angeles Exposition Park museum,

Since winning the International Competition of the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in 2014, MAD Architects has developed three unique designs for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art, each of which respond to the three proposed project locations in Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. The non-profit museum’s confirmed home in Los Angeles sits on approximately 11 acres of land in Exposition Park and will feature at least $400 million worth of art spanning Narrative Art, the Art of Cinema, and Digital Art.

Lucas Museum of Narrative Art by MAD Architects, George Lucas museum, Lucas Museum in Los Angeles, Lucas Museum groundbreaking, Lucas Museum architects, Los Angeles Exposition Park museum,

Lucas Museum of Narrative Art by MAD Architects, George Lucas museum, Lucas Museum in Los Angeles, Lucas Museum groundbreaking, Lucas Museum architects, Los Angeles Exposition Park museum,

Related: The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art will bring a massive 11-acre green roof to Los Angeles

“It appears as if a futuristic spaceship, with a mysterious and surrealistic attitude, has “landed” on the site’s natural environment,” wrote MAD Architects. “People from all walks of life are welcome to feel and appreciate this cultural paradise. The interior of the building has been designed as a huge bright and open cave. Skylights allow sunlight to flood the interior space, and guide visitors through the museum’s various programs. The first floor and roof of the building are expansive public areas that can be enjoyed by everyone. People can exercise here, relax, talk to the surrounding natural environment, and directly experience nature in the urban environment.”

+ MAD Architects

Via ArchDaily

Images via MAD Architects