Taipei’s lush jungle landscape has crept indoors in the form of a “green dreamscape.” MVRDV and Argentinian textile artist Alexandra Kehayoglou transformed a 180-person lecture hall into an incredible sight with wall-to-wall carpets woven out of recycled threads that mimic natural textures like moss, water, trees, and pastures. Located at JUT Group’s head office, this wall-covering artwork references Taiwan’s sub-tropical environment while providing acoustic control and an unforgettable lecture backdrop.

JUT Group Lecture Hall by MVRDV and Alexandra Kehayoglou, JUT Group Art, hand tufting carpet, recycled threads, recycled thread artworks, JUT Group art, JUT Lecture Hall, Alexandra Kehayoglou, Alexandra Kehayoglou art

Sprawled out across a 240-square-meter lecture hall, the massive installation looks surprisingly lifelike from afar. The variety of textures, shapes, and patterns evoke a diverse plants palette ranging from delicate flowers on the carpet floor to thick mosses clinging on the far back wall. Alexandra Kehayoglou created the site-specific textile work using discarded threads from her family’s carpet factory in Buenos Aires. The unique artwork was made with a laborious hand-tufting technique and took over a year to complete.

JUT Group Lecture Hall by MVRDV and Alexandra Kehayoglou, JUT Group Art, hand tufting carpet, recycled threads, recycled thread artworks, JUT Group art, JUT Lecture Hall, Alexandra Kehayoglou, Alexandra Kehayoglou art

JUT Group Lecture Hall by MVRDV and Alexandra Kehayoglou, JUT Group Art, hand tufting carpet, recycled threads, recycled thread artworks, JUT Group art, JUT Lecture Hall, Alexandra Kehayoglou, Alexandra Kehayoglou art

Related: Amazing landscape carpets transform your living room into a lush, grassy meadow

“The interior is literally a green dream,” says Winy Maas, MVRDV co-founder. “Together with the artwork, it represents the natural landscape of Taiwan and at the same time, acts as an acoustic intervention. In the midst of the hyper-urban condition of Taipei, audiences will be surrounded by this green dreamscape.” The interior design builds on the research of MVRDV and their think tank, The Why Factory, into the potential of future transformable elements.

+ MVRDV

+ Alexandra Kehayoglou

Images via MVRDV