Cricket Shelter by Terreform ONE, Cricket Shelter at Brooklyn Navy Yard, insect farm by Terreform ONE, insect farm doubles as a shelter, disaster relief shelter and farm

While many Americans might squirm at the thought of eating crickets, over two billion people around the world eat insects every day. Unlike conventional livestock, these locally harvested crickets do not require immense amounts of water or space to produce a large amount of protein. The flavor of crickets also changes based on their diet—the designers are experimenting with feeding the insects orange peels, apple cores, and lime rinds—and can also be ground into cricket flour for a variety of uses.

Cricket Shelter by Terreform ONE, Cricket Shelter at Brooklyn Navy Yard, insect farm by Terreform ONE, insect farm doubles as a shelter, disaster relief shelter and farm

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The Cricket Shelter was originally designed as a structure for disaster zones that doubles as an easy and nutritious food source. The minimal white pavilion can be easily manufactured offsite and comprises a CNC-milled plywood archway that can be fitted with easy-to-clean plastic containers and is large enough for a person to sleep under. Each design can be modified in a computer program that optimizes the shape for solar orientation and natural ventilation. To make things even more interesting, a wind quill ventilation system amplifies the sounds of the crickets chirping.

+ Terreform ONE

Via Fast Company

Images via Terreform ONE