Hurricane Maria has left swaths of Puerto Rico without power – and millions of people might have to go without electricity for months. The storm’s devastation has stirred new interest in clean energy sources like solar and wind. Energy experts say increasing renewables and transitioning from centralized grids to microgrids could boost resilience as Puerto Rico and other Caribbean islands weather storms.


Puerto Rico, Caribbean, Hurricane Maria, hurricane, hurricanes, storm, storms, electricity, power, grid, microgrid, microgrids, energy, fossil fuels, renewable energy, renewables, natural disaster, natural disasters, crisis

CARICOM, a Caribbean nation consortium, already hoped to hit 47 percent renewable energy by 2027. The recent hurricanes could act as a motivation to work for that goal. Caribbean countries in the past have relied mostly on imported fossil fuels, which are expensive both for the islands and for the environment. And storms can cripple power lines.

Related: Puerto Rico could be without electricity for months due to Hurricane Maria

Puerto Rico, Caribbean, Hurricane Maria, hurricane, hurricanes, storm, storms, electricity, power, grid, microgrid, microgrids, energy, fossil fuels, renewable energy, renewables, natural disaster, natural disasters, crisis

There is an alternative, according to The Washington Post. Renewable sources, coupled with battery storage, powering small grids could offer more resiliency. Fossil fuels would offer backup—at least initially until battery storage becomes more affordable. The microgrids could be connected to a main grid but could also be isolated.

With this new setup, the Caribbean could benefit from trade winds and solar panels. According to renewable energy expert Tom Rogers, who works at Britain’s Coventry University, solar systems in the tropics can “generate over one and a half times more than exactly the same PV system” installed in a location with a higher latitude like Europe.

Rogers told The Washington Post, “You look at islands like Dominica, Anguilla, and other islands affected by the recent hurricanes, I’ve spoken to a couple of the utilities, and they say they would prefer to rebuild using distributed generation with storage, and just trying to reduce the amount of transmission lines. Because that’s where their energy systems fail. It’s having these overhead cables.”

Via The Washington Post

Images via Sgt. Jose Ahiram Diaz-Ramos/Puerto Rico National Guard and NOAA Satellites Twitter