This small hut nestled in the Scottish Highlands combines the influences of Le Corbusier’s iconic Chapelle Notre Dame du Haut and those of the region’s vernacular architecture. The building, designed by Moxon Architects, is covered with heather, moss and stone gathered from local hillsides, which provide both camouflage and additional insulation.


Culardoch Shieling hut, Moxon Architects, green roof, tiny hut, Scotland, locally sourced materials, natural building materials, green architecture, tiny house

The Culardoch Shieling hut sits in the grounds of the client’s Highland estate in the mountains of Cairngorms National Park in Scotland. Its rectangular windows reference Le Corbusier’s famous Ronchamp cathedral, while its overall form and materials establish a connection with the area’s vernacular architecture, livestock holdings and Scottish farming crofts in particular.

Related: A green-roofed Hobbit home anyone can build in just 3 days

Culardoch Shieling hut, Moxon Architects, green roof, tiny hut, Scotland, locally sourced materials, natural building materials, green architecture, tiny house

The choice of natural materials and construction technique reflects the client’s request that the building have minimal impact on the terrain. Exterior walls made from unprocessed larch wood envelop the interior lined in spruce. A large dining table and wood-burning stove dominate this cozy space and facilitate social gatherings.

+ Moxon Architects

Via Dezeen

Culardoch Shieling hut, Moxon Architects, green roof, tiny hut, Scotland, locally sourced materials, natural building materials, green architecture, tiny house

Culardoch Shieling hut, Moxon Architects, green roof, tiny hut, Scotland, locally sourced materials, natural building materials, green architecture, tiny house

Culardoch Shieling hut, Moxon Architects, green roof, tiny hut, Scotland, locally sourced materials, natural building materials, green architecture, tiny house

Culardoch Shieling hut, Moxon Architects, green roof, tiny hut, Scotland, locally sourced materials, natural building materials, green architecture, tiny house