Over 1.4 million acres burned in Chile last year, marking the country’s worst wildfire season in history. According to Mother Nature Network, the fire left in its wake a ravaged landscape – but a furry team led by Francisca Torres, a dog trainer who also runs the dog-oriented community, Pewos, came to the rescue. She outfitted three border collies with backpacks filled with seeds, and sent then dashing through the forest.

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Das, Olivia, and Summer will melt your heart. As they careen through the forest sporting seed-filled backpacks, seeds trickle out; the humans behind the mission hope the spilled seeds will sprout and grow, reviving the forest. For the animals, it’s just a chance to frolic and have fun, according to Torres, their owner.

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Feliz dia madre tierra ❤️

Posted by Pewos on Sunday, May 14, 2017

Das is the oldest at six, and she leads the way with her pups, Summer and Olivia, both two-years-old. The dogs earn treats as they wait for their backpacks to be filled with more seeds, when they come back to their handlers, and at the end of the day’s work. They can cover up to 18 miles, spreading over 20 pounds of future plants, according to Mother Nature Network.

Posted by Pewos on Thursday, April 20, 2017

Torres launched the effort in March 2017, and went back to the forest regularly over six months. Her sister, Constanza Torres, also helped; the two women pay for the native seeds, backpacks, and trips to the forest and plan to start the project up again soon. Torres told Mother Nature Network, “We have seen many results in flora and fauna coming back to the burned forest!”

Posted by Pewos on Friday, March 31, 2017

Posted by Pewos on Friday, March 31, 2017

Francisca Torres told Mother Nature Network they specifically use border collies because they are super smart. When they’re not reviving forests, the dogs work with sheep and in disc and obedience training.

Via Mother Nature Network

Images via Depositphotos