Gallery: Gorgeous Green House is Wrapped in a Lush Vertical Garden in B...

 
The mezzanine is protected by a textile netting and offers an expansive view through the the building’s grand glass wall façade. The vegetated facades face north, east and south to enhance privacy. Since a west-facing window wall will receive an excessive amount of sunlight in the summer months, immense translucent white polyester curtains hang from the ceiling to the ground floor to ensure efficient shade for optimal heating and cooling control.

Dubbed Milly Film, the mixed-use building is designed to serve as a cinematographer’s residence, production studio, and workspace. The design began with the decision to maintain the existing structure of a small one story house on the ground level. The renovation provided structure for the entry, office and kitchen for the residence, and the living room and stairway extend to the rest of the building.

The production studios are housed mostly in the cellar also take up a small section on the second floor. With the addition of a mezzanine, the second floor also features a master suite and bedrooms and bathrooms for 5 children. The mezzanine is protected by a textile netting and offers an expansive view through the the building’s grand glass wall façade. The vegetated facades face north, east and south to enhance privacy. Since a west-facing window wall will receive an excessive amount of sunlight in the summer months, immense translucent white polyester curtains hang from the ceiling to the ground floor to ensure efficient shade for optimal heating and cooling control.

Samyn and Partners worked together with Patrick Blanc to finalize the Vertical Garden concept. Through careful planning the team determined the necessary support systems, insulation and water-tightness necessary for plant life. Felt stapled onto rigid PVC panels acts as a support system for irrigation and fertilization of the building’s beautiful green façade.

+ Samyn and Partners

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12 Comments

  1. gorgeousgreenhouse March 24, 2014 at 10:41 am

    I would love you to visit my Gorgeous Green House in Africa:

    gorgeousgreenhouse.wordpress.com

  2. welz February 28, 2011 at 2:05 pm

    Orientation aside, I want to ask the question about water. I think the idea of living walls is great. But the question remains. Is the wall using potable water? If so then the sustainability of the project is a sham. Drinking water is a high energy product. One of the highest.

    Idea – Connecting a septic drain field to a living wall. Drain fields use soils to do the finish processing of home sewage. If the green wall were used in this process then energy saving and water quality would be maximized. Maybe not doable in urban settings but re-claimed water is available for those situations.
    http://www.ecolandscapegroup.com

  3. In Vitro Meat Habitat i... July 8, 2010 at 1:01 pm

    [...] waxed lyrical about botanical walls, green roofs and living treehouses on Inhabitat for years – is the next logical step a home [...]

  4. renschede June 14, 2010 at 9:16 am

    Given the orientation, my criticism is with the response – I am not convinced that this response was the only solution available. To be effective, west-facing glass should be shaded on the outside – in this case it is my impression that it is inside, or am I mistaken? Many beautiful solutions are possible – If you like Rudolph or Corbusier, they created many… It seems to me that for this house the aesthetic conception was prioritized over energy efficiency. Alternatively, a different aesthetic strategy could be chosen and the west-facing wall could be partially opaque – even 50% open provides plenty of view access, and I suspect it would be far more comfortable to live with. If access to light is the concern, South-facing clerestory windows almost always have access to great light.

    Sincerely,
    Ryan.

  5. soulesmj June 9, 2010 at 3:39 pm

    Please review the article and photos again before you criticize the orientation. This was an existing building and if you look at the site plan, there are buildings directly to the south, and open land to the west, so privacy & clear access to light are major issue here. Sometimes compromises must be made due to existing conditions.

  6. renschede May 18, 2010 at 10:54 am

    Hi Kristi,

    I agree, the architects should be certainly credited for a beautiful design and for their willingness to modify plans that had already been prepared. And I too am inspired by the potential paradigm shift green roofs and walls could bring to the separation of “manmade” and “natural” environments, however I am increasingly alarmed at the ever-increasing levels of global energy consumption – no doubt you are as well. I hope you do not feel I am over-emphasizing this point, and perhaps this discussion would be best continued outside of this forum, but my concern is that your description of “optimal heating and cooling control” obscures the significant energy impact of a tremendously common mistake, and perpetuates the myth that unwanted solar heat gain can be effectively controlled inside the glass. Why not credit the architects for their achievements and willingness to modify the design, but take the opportunity to educate your readers about these pervasive mistakes?

    Sincerely,
    Ryan Enschede

  7. renschede May 18, 2010 at 10:53 am

    Hi Kristi,

    I agree, the architects should be certainly credited for a beautiful design and for their willingness to modifify plans that had already been prepared. And I too am inspired by the potential paradigm shift green roofs and walls could bring to the separation of “manmade” and “natural” environments, however I am increasingly alarmed at the ever-increasing levels of global energy consumption – no doubt you are as well. I hope you do not feel I am over-emphasizing this point, and perhaps this discussion would be best continued outside of this forum, but my concern is that your description of “optimal heating and cooling control” obscures the significant energy impact of a tremendously common mistake, and perpetuates the myth that unwanted solar heat gain can be effectively controlled inside the glass. Why not credit the architects for their achievements and willingness to modify the design, but take the opportunity to educate your readers about these pervasive mistakes?

    Sincerely,
    Ryan Enschede

  8. Kristi Bernick Kristi Bernick April 2, 2010 at 1:50 pm

    Ryan Enschede

    I agree with your comments and I at first also had similar feelings of disappointment. This is a sustainable publication and our goal is to provide the world with sustainable design and concepts. Considering the position of the house was not optimal for passive solar design I believe that the architects made a conscious decision to focus on the client’s privacy instead. I would also like to make a point that the design of this house evolved over an 8 year period. The design was not driven by sustainable concepts until after original plans were already established. With that in mind I would like to congratulate Samyn and Partners for taking the extra time to edit existing plans and “greening” a specific part the house.

  9. Debra Lee Baldwin April 1, 2010 at 9:09 pm

    Fascinating. The concept of a green roof gone vertical. And you could have it in San Diego (where I live, too) if you used low-water plants (such as succulents) and drip irrigation. A case in point was the succulent cube room at this year’s San Francisco Flower & Garden Show.

  10. davidwayneosedach April 1, 2010 at 6:33 pm

    I love that house! Pity is – it must need a lot of water. Couldn’t afford it in San Diego.

  11. urban sherp April 1, 2010 at 3:31 pm

    Am obsessed with vertical gardens, and this one is amazing. Thanks so much for sharing this find. Curious as to how the maintenance is for the long term since I struggle to maintain the 6 square feet of garden I have….
    Here are some smaller scale vertical gardens I have been wanting to test out:
    http://www.urbansherp.com/how-does-your-garden-grow

    Would love to hear from people who have had success with vertical gardens!

  12. renschede March 31, 2010 at 10:30 am

    This is a beautiful house, and the Patrick Blanc walls are as always moving, but I am astounded to discover that this house faces WEST! What a tremendous shame! Curtains are NOT a solution – they are a band-aid over a fundamental mistake. I assumed at first glance that the house had been designed to incorporate direct gain passive solar heating – indeed, if his house had been rotated to face south it would have heated itself from the sun’s rays through the glass. Instead, all that glazing will hemorrhage energy in the winter, and it will be an oven in the summer… We CANNOT continue to make such mistakes if we are to reduce energy use in a meaningful way.

    It is tremendously discouraging to see my professional colleagues continue to display their ignorance of basic climate response (sun position summer vs. winter) and equally discouraging for a great blog like Inhabitat to minimize the mistake – we both (designers and media) have to work together if we are to combat ignorance in the design world and “change the world”.

    Ryan Enschede, sustainable architect, Brooklyn NY

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