Emily Pilloton

TENNIS BALL BENCHES by Remy/Veenhuizen

by , 07/04/07

Tennis ball benches, reclaimed design, reclaimed materials, tejo remy, rene veenhuizen, remy veenhuizen, dutch design, droog

You may have thoughts tennis balls were just for tennis – but creative Dutch designer Tejo Remy has found a another use for the bright yellow bouncy felt-and-rubber balls. The same material qualities that make tennis balls bright, bouncy and easy-to-spot make for seating that is comfortable, sturdy, and extremely eye-catching. While many museum goers observe works of art perched upon the usual wooden bench, visitors at Rotterdam’s Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen are able to sit and stare in style on these colorful and clever tennis ball benches designed by Tejo Remy and Rene VeenHuizen.


The seats are fashioned from a steel frame and dozens of tennis balls, to bring a bit of color and bounce to the museum’s interior. We love the idea of museum furniture design as another opportunity for art. Tejo Remy was one of the speakers at our recent Reclaiming Design panel, during which he mentioned this project and its integration of found and repurposed vernacular objects.

+ Remy/Veenhuizen

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30 Comments

  1. rukhlsteinfeld May 2, 2014 at 12:04 pm

    ok

  2. KAIF GHAZNAVI February 24, 2008 at 4:40 am

    i was working with the same imagery(balls) but in a different medium. while browsing came across ur site. i’m glad i did. stopped me from recreating the image and also gave me a challenge of creating something different.great work.

  3. bee January 15, 2008 at 8:35 am

    um why do tennis balls go flat

  4. Florida Tennis News &ra... October 4, 2007 at 10:50 am

    [...] You may have thoughts tennis balls were just for tennis – but creative Dutch designer Tejo Remy has found a another use for the balls. The same material qualities that make tennis balls bright, bouncy and easy-to-spot make for seating that is comfortable, sturdy, and extremely eye-catching. While many museum goers observe works of art perched upon the usual wooden bench, visitors at Rotterdam’s Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen are able to sit and stare in style on these colorful and clever tennis ball benches. The seats are fashioned from a steel frame and dozens of tennis balls, to bring a bit of color and bounce to the museum’s interior…read article… [...]

  5. TENNIS BALL BENCHES by ... October 4, 2007 at 5:08 am

    [...] read more | digg story [...]

  6. Ball games for the lazy July 27, 2007 at 6:46 pm

    [...] Via Inhabitat [...]

  7. När tennis är tråkig... July 27, 2007 at 6:01 am

    [...] Via Inhabitat. [...]

  8. Mokko’z » B... July 27, 2007 at 12:37 am

    [...] Reciclando Pelotas. [...]

  9. jim July 19, 2007 at 9:45 am

    charles furniture from ireland did something like this a couple of years ago. it cements my feeling that in design an idea is worth nothing but when one is a high profile designer like tejo hob knobing among the clique within dutch design this is deemed ingenious

  10. Die Tennisball-Bank &la... July 19, 2007 at 4:59 am

    [...] [via] [...]

  11. TENNIS BALL BENCHES at ... July 18, 2007 at 1:43 pm

    [...] While that may be a distant dream for most of us we can always show our love for the game via the TENNIS BALL BENCHES by Remy/Veenhuizen! The seats are fashioned from a steel frame and dozens of tennis balls. Bedroom, [...]

  12. Perliukai #315 : nežin... July 17, 2007 at 9:32 am

    [...] po teniso žaidimo geriausia ilsėtis ant suoliuko, padaryto iš teniso kamuoliukų. Pažiūrėjus sporto prekių parduotuvėje, kiek kainuoja geri teniso kamuoliukai, supranti, kad [...]

  13. Game, Sit And Match: Te... July 16, 2007 at 2:44 pm

    [...] Dutch designer Tejo Remy must have decided to give up tennis and sit around all day instead, so he took all the tennis balls he could find and turned them into these benches, selling the idea to the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam. It’s a prime example of what relaxed dope laws will do for the enlightenment of a culture. Come to think of it, tennis balls are fuzzy and cushy, so if you mount them to a steel frame like Tejo did here, these might just turn out to be comfy seats. Don’t try this with baseballs. [inhabitat] [...]

  14. 肯定深受小朋友... July 16, 2007 at 1:22 pm

    [...] 資料來源:inhabitat:TENNIS BALL BENCHES by Remy/Veenhuizen [...]

  15. The FrameShot Tennis Bl... July 16, 2007 at 12:55 pm

    [...] designer Tejo Remy has made several couches/loungers/something at a place called Inhabit. I think they look quite comfortable. Though where’s the “love” [...]

  16. U.S. Open Series Kicks ... July 16, 2007 at 11:34 am

    [...] Found Art: Tennis ball benches. [inhabitat] [...]

  17. Black.Platypus » ... July 16, 2007 at 11:22 am

    [...] Dutch designer Tejo Remy must have decided to give up tennis and sit around all day instead, so he took all the tennis balls he could find and turned them into these benches, selling the idea to the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam. It’s a prime example of what relaxed dope laws will do for the enlightenment of a culture. Come to think of it, tennis balls are fuzzy and cushy, so if you mount them to a steel frame like Tejo did here, these might just turn out to be comfy seats. Don’t try this with baseballs. [inhabitat] [...]

  18. Tennis Ball Bench | Cra... July 14, 2007 at 9:57 am

    [...] Dutch designer Tejo Remy has designed and constructed these eye-catching benches made up of tennis balls at Rotterdam’s Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen. A great alternative to those hard cold benches usually in museums! But why not try your hand at making something like a stool for your home?[ via ] Link. [...]

  19. FashionistaBlog »... July 13, 2007 at 7:23 am

    [...] tennis balls after Wimbeldon – create a bench out of them of course! Created by Dutch designers Tejo Remy and Rene VennHuizen, these benches are fashioned with a steel frame surrounded by dozens of (new) tennis balls and are [...]

  20. Precioso ejemplo de reu... July 10, 2007 at 4:33 pm

    [...] vía Inhabitat, descubro este diseñador Tejo Reimi y me quedo flipado con este diseño hecho con pelotas de tenis…realmente [...]

  21. Julie July 10, 2007 at 1:23 pm

    It is possible that they used used balls and then washed them- then, you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between new and used. I don’t even play that much tennis but it is true that you go through balls like nobody’s business and the only reuse that I know of is giving them to dogs- but how many balls can you really give a dog?? So using them for some other purpose where you could take advantage of their springyness is a great idea.

  22. vicki July 8, 2007 at 4:53 pm

    yes i am in agreement with androo and tyler. tennis centers could be wonderful resources for supplying used balls to designers but wouldnt it also be great to motivate individuals who play on public courts to also bring their used balls there?

  23. Nicky Chang July 5, 2007 at 10:17 pm

    yes. pls use discarded flat tennis balls for our next bench! =)

  24. Tyler July 5, 2007 at 1:19 pm

    If anybody plays tennis, you know how quickly tennis balls go flat. I can’t even imagine the number of used tennis balls I have tossed in the trash in my lifetime. If the designer can team up with tennis centers to use their discarded balls (they could be washed), this project would have a much better impact. Also, I’d like to see a couch with some sort of back support, that would be nifty.

  25. Architecture Fan July 5, 2007 at 11:57 am

    Green washing green tennis balls?

  26. Elizabeth July 5, 2007 at 11:17 am

    I’m in complete agreement with Androo. Neat? Yes. Ecological? Nope.

  27. Frank July 5, 2007 at 10:28 am

    Malcolm (my cat) would love one.

  28. TENNIS BALL BENCH &laqu... July 5, 2007 at 10:13 am

    [...] Link via Inhabitat  [...]

  29. Androo July 5, 2007 at 9:15 am

    I really do like it, but I think it’s a bit disingenuous to call repurposing of this nature ecologically friendly (if, indeed, he does), since these are very obviously not post-consumer tennis balls, they’re just being diverted from one open loop waste stream to another equivalent one.

    If there’s a little flex in that frame, though, I bet it would be pretty comfortable.

  30. Katie Konrath July 5, 2007 at 5:44 am

    Very different and unusual. A nice touch for an art museum, but could be fun elsewhere as well.

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