Gallery: Stunning ‘Virtue of Blue’ Chandelier Made From 500 Fluttering ...

 
The butterfly solar cells are self-sustaining as they absorb daylight to power the chandelier

On display now at London Gallery, Blain|Southern‘s Virtue of Blue chandelier measures 144 x 144 x 162 mm in size and is composed of cesium solar cells, a hand-blown glass bulb, and steel and aluminum structural elements. The butterfly solar cells are self-sustaining as they absorb daylight to power their own illumination. Four different breeds of butterflies flutter around the flame-like glass bulb in the center of the chandelier.

Virtue of Blue is part of a solo exhibit called The Curious Image along with Verhoeven’s highly polished steel Lectori Salutem desk. A wonder of electrical engineering, art and fabrication, Virtue of Blue is more than a piece of eco art or even a practical light fixture – it is a stunning work that gives testament to the power of nature and sustainability.

+ Blain|Southern

+ Demakersvan

Via MocoLoco

Images ©Giulietta Verdon Roe and Bas Helbers

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13 Comments

  1. anne-lilindskog January 19, 2012 at 9:57 am

    Awesome idea! And beautiful as well! Gives me lots of inspiration!!!

  2. T.Hook June 7, 2011 at 9:11 am

    It is a stunning work that gives testament to the power of money. It retails at a stunning £75,000!

  3. Inhabitat’s Week ... May 30, 2011 at 1:39 pm

    [...] power. W&#1077 &#1072&#406&#1109&#959 showcased a stunning chandelier m&#1072&#1281&#1077 fr&#959m 500 fluttering photovoltaic butterflies, &#1072&#1495&#1281 w&#1077 saw Nevada kick-&#1109t&#1072rt construction &#959&#1495 t&#1211&#1077 [...]

  4. Inhabitat’s Week ... May 30, 2011 at 11:28 am

    [...] completely phase out the use of nuclear power. We also showcased a stunning chandelier made from 500 fluttering photovoltaic butterflies, and we saw Nevada kick-start construction on the US’ first molten salt solar plant, which [...]

  5. Inhabitat’s Week ... May 30, 2011 at 2:42 am

    [...] completely phase out the use of nuclear power. We also showcased a stunning chandelier made from 500 fluttering photovoltaic butterflies, and we saw Nevada kick-start construction on the US' first molten salt solar plant, which will [...]

  6. Jeff’s Home &raqu... May 30, 2011 at 1:47 am

    [...] completely phase out the use of nuclear power. We also showcased a stunning chandelier made from 500 fluttering photovoltaic butterflies, and we saw Nevada kick-start construction on the US’ first molten salt solar plant, which [...]

  7. Inhabitat’s Week ... May 30, 2011 at 1:30 am

    [...] completely phase out the use of nuclear power. We also showcased a stunning chandelier made from 500 fluttering photovoltaic butterflies, and we saw Nevada kick-start construction on the US’ first molten salt solar plant, which [...]

  8. Inhabitat’s Week ... May 29, 2011 at 11:33 pm

    [...] completely phase out the use of nuclear power. We also showcased a stunning chandelier made from 500 fluttering photovoltaic butterflies, and we saw Nevada kick-start construction on the US’ first molten salt solar plant, which [...]

  9. Inhabitat’s Week ... May 29, 2011 at 11:07 pm

    [...] completely phase out the use of nuclear power. We also showcased a stunning chandelier made from 500 fluttering photovoltaic butterflies, and we saw Nevada kick-start construction on the US’ first molten salt solar plant, which [...]

  10. Inhabitat’s Week ... May 29, 2011 at 10:39 pm

    [...] completely phase out the use of nuclear power. We also showcased a stunning chandelier made from 500 fluttering photovoltaic butterflies, and we saw Nevada kick-start construction on the US’ first molten salt solar plant, which [...]

  11. RE wonk May 26, 2011 at 12:57 pm

    FYI, although the Demakersvan website says these solar cells are made from “celisium,” which isn’t even a word, and Inhabitat translated this to “cesium,” these solar cells are, without a doubt, made from silicon. Since the close-up reveals a mottled appearance to the cells–as if blooms of frost were starting to form on them–we can say specifically that these are made from multicrystalline silicon, which is essentially an aggregate of smaller silicon crystals.

  12. thedisgruntledarchitect May 24, 2011 at 12:16 pm

    This is a beautiful chandelier and I love the concept behind it, very clever and a nice artist approach to green design. Well done!

  13. TimeYazilim May 24, 2011 at 5:11 am

    Nice professional photo’s (Y)

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