Rachel Ross

Why Our Ancestors Built Round Houses - and Why it Still Makes Sense to Build Round Structures Today

by , 08/13/12

building round houses, round home construction, less waste

Round buildings use less wall, floor and roof mate­ri­als to enclose the same square footage as a rec­tan­gu­lar struc­ture.  15 to 20% less mate­r­ial is used to cre­ate the same square foot build­ing com­pared to a rec­tan­gu­lar design! This means the possibility for a smaller eco-footprint and more living space for less cost. It also means less sur­face area in con­tact with adverse weather con­di­tions, which improves the over­all dura­bil­ity and energy effi­ciency of the home.

The acoustics of round space can be out of this world. The curve soft­ens the sounds inside the build­ing mak­ing it the per­fect place for rest and reflec­tion or for social­iz­ing and lis­ten­ing to and play­ing music (…think long winter evenings of storytelling around the central fire….) The shape also pre­vents noise from pen­e­trat­ing in from the out­side. Sound waves dis­si­pate as they wrap around the build­ing, shield­ing the interior from loud out­side noise.
modern day yurt, circular house, round buildings,

Our ancestors also understood a round home quality that is less measurable than the intelligent use of energy, the clever space allocation and the powerful and natural movement of air and sound. David Raitt, yurt builder, describes it “Circular living provides a balance of looking inward and outward, looking out at the natural environment and surroundings but then coming in again to the self and the hearth.”  You might call it curve appeal.

A 21st century home built with modern materials can be a safe, energy efficient , healthy-living-by-design House of the Future that Comes from the Past!

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6 Comments

  1. Melissa Kriger February 8, 2014 at 11:10 am

    Of course they did! Our ancestors were aware of the harmony and synergy of sacred geometry and built to reflect this truth. :D

  2. lolli19 September 18, 2013 at 3:23 pm

    I think these are gorgeous!

  3. BobWet May 1, 2013 at 10:07 am

    Here is a 2008 Round House in Ireland:
    http://www.winkens.ie/strawbale.htm

  4. rachel ross August 15, 2012 at 9:48 pm

    Hi bthinker- Your project sounds really interesting! I agree that adding submerged floors increases the functionality of the space combined with the hexagonal shape- check out our website at http://www.mandalahomes.com for other examples. Thanks for your comments!~Rachel

  5. robdude robdude August 14, 2012 at 5:31 pm

    Just when we think we no it all, only to find out our ancestors had it pegged a thousand years back. Why am I not surprised!

  6. bthinker bthinker August 10, 2012 at 6:07 pm

    A very advanced Shelter I’ve been working on for years put this compression effect and centerpiece cooling to use. I’m making a downward spiraling biodome of sorts. I agree though, I see anything that’s not round/oval as a primitive box. I believe a house also needs to have submerged floors though to complete the funcionality of the dome shape efficiency, a hexagon works best for the sub floors with the correct support system as a round basement would easily cave but a hexagon done right can bounce impact to the adjacent walls.

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