The days of stuffing the family and gear into a cramped, dark camper are long gone. Today’s transforming mobile homes are packed with technology that allows them to expand at the push of a button, double (or triple) in size, and conquer the most rugged of landscapes. Read on to check out seven high-tech tiny homes on wheels for nature-loving wanderers.

Extended De Markies Camper

The De Markies Trailer triples in size

There are few things we love more than a tiny camper that doubles in size — unless it’s a camper that triples in size. At first glance, the incredible De Markies trailer doesn’t look like much of a camper. It’s a tiny, nondescript box on wheels — until its accordion-like ends are folded out, tripling its interior space. The inside is equipped with collapsible furniture, a full kitchenette with a four-person dinette table and a spacious lounge area that can adjust to be open-air. The De Markies camper was created by Dutch designer Eduard Bohtlingk more than thirty years ago, proving that good, strategic design is timeless.

Air Opus Pop-Up Camper's self-inflating pop-up tent

The Air Opus camper inflates in 90 seconds

Adventurers know the value of being efficient while on the road — and that’s why the Air Opus is a godsend. The innovative camper is equipped with a self-inflating system that pops up in 90 seconds flat, with just a simple flick of a switch. The added space and saved time are great advantages when setting up camp. When it’s time to hit the road again, the Air Opus has quick-release valves that deflate the camper in 30 seconds. The entire structure can be folded up and ready to go in less than two minutes.

The white Homie camper in a grassy landscape

The Homie expands in a minute

When it comes to the next generation of miniature recreational vehicles, the cute little Homie — designed by Wide Path Camper — is leading the pack. When folded up, the camper measures just 58 inches long, 57 inches high and 39 inches wide. But when the outer shell is rotated back 90 degrees and fastened to the front inner shell, it expands its interior substantially. Its compact size and handy setup make it a great weekend camper.

Related: Solar-powered EarthCruiser camper expands at the push of a button

The red Beauer Caravan that extends outwards.

Beauer’s camper telescopes to 3X its size

Tiny and sleek, the Beauer 3X embodies all there is to love about the modern-day trailer. French company Beauer was inspired by the compact ease that a typical tear drop camper offers, but wanted to increase floor size when parked. Using a “nestled can” design, the Beauer 3X structure expands outward to three times its size in about 20 seconds.

The Sealander caravan with an open sunroof

The Sealander pulls double duty as a boat

Campers often cater to land-loving adventurers, but rarely do we see a design crafted to go on both land and water. The Sealander is an innovative, one-of-a-kind caravan that pulls double duty as a boat. Once on-site, the camper just needs a motor attachment before being eased into the water. A sun roof gives the camper an open-air option while navigating the high seas… or just any old lake. All of its components are corrosion free, so rust will never be a problem.

Fiftyte Adventure system with pop up tent

Fiftyten turns any pickup into a tiny home

Fiftyten Adventure System can transform most pickup trucks into tiny mobile homes. The camper is comprised of three parts: first, a simple tray with side storage and a pull-out rear drawer provides space for supplies. Second, a large box that fits on the tray can be equipped with a kitchen module. And finally, a pop-up camper on top of the box provides extra space for sleeping, or it can serve as a storage area for bikes, kayaks and other gear.

The extended Doubleback Van system

The Doubleback extends 6 feet in an instant

At first glance, the Doubleback Van looks like a normal van. However, the vehicle hides a few astonishing secrets within its humble exterior. With just the press of a button, a rear compartment automatically slides outward, doubling the interior space. The top of the van has a roof that can be elevated, revealing space for a drop-down bed and three windows. Inside, there is another fold-out bed, a dining area and a small kitchen. The strategic space-extending features allow the Doubleback Van to comfortably house four people.

Images via Eduard Bohtlingk, Opus Campers, Wide Perth Camper, Beauer, Sealander, Fiftyten, and Doubleback Van