Victoria’s Yarra Valley is an idyllic region known for its award-winning vineyards. Now, guests to the Medhurst Winery have a new, sustainable tasting area to enjoy the label’s delicious wine selection. The family-run winery has just added the Cellar Door — a contemporary extension that was built with resilient and sustainable features. Designed by Folk Architects, the new contemporary space allows visitors to view the entire wine-making process, from the vineyards and production area to the gorgeous tasting facility.


a long view the horizontal building. in the background is another building made of cement, with grass and trees surrounding it. in the foreground is more grass.

The main building of the winery sits in a prestigious location, elevated on a sloped landscape overlooking the vineyards. A low-lying elongated volume, the contemporary building features one section made of heat-reflective, polycarbonate material. The translucent walls allow natural light to illuminate the wine-making area during the day, while at night revealing a picturesque view of wine-making equipment found within.

a side angle of a long gray cement structure with an open walk-through area. trees in the background

lights illuminate the outer wall of one of the gray buildings (left). the buildings are atop a hill of green grass

Related: Modern timber winery blends Japanese and Viennese influences

The winery’s rooftop features an expansive green roof with a state-of-the-art rainwater collection system. According to the winery, the roof collects around 500,000 liters of rainwater every year. This water is filtered and used in the wine-making process.

a long horizontal building from a different angle, with trees and mountains in the background, and what appears to be a black cat on the lawn in front of the building

a long view of sunlight glinting off the horizontal building's floor-to-ceiling windows. in the background is another building made of cement, with grass and trees surrounding it

Now, visitors to the winery will have a sophisticated place to taste the wonderful Medhurst wines. The new Cellar Door sits adjacent to the 250-ton wine-making facility and features a design that mimics its linear volume, while subtly curving around the ends.

a long view the horizontal building. in the background is another building made of cement, with grass and trees surrounding it. in the foreground is more grass.

The interior of the Cellar building, with wood-panel walls and a 40-foot concrete bench with wine storage behind it

Located in a bushfire zone, the Cellar Door’s materials were chosen for their durable and sustainable qualities. The building’s main materials include a bold mix of oxidized steel and fire-resistant timber. Additionally, the roof eaves were carefully designed to jut out over the building’s frame to let in the maximum amount of sunlight during winter, while also reducing solar glare during summer. This passive feature allows the building to reduce its mechanical heating and cooling throughout the year.

a long view of the horizontal building with a gray wall to the left in the foreground and trees next to the building in the background

two gray buildings, with one slightly in front of the other, creating a tiered look. the buildings are atop a hill of green grass

On the inside, visitors are greeted by a warm space designed for taking in the incredible views and tasting the award-winning wine. The entrance-way includes a 40-foot concrete bench that sits under a wall of thin timber slats. Raw steel accents throughout give the interior a modern industrial feel.

a yellow-tinted photo of a basement with wood barrels on either side

interior of the winery showing five silver wine barrels in the foreground and more in the background. a yellow overlook area in the top left.

With the addition of the Cellar Door, visitors can view the entire wine-making process. From the wine tastings offered at the Cellar Door, visitors can follow a winding path through the beautiful landscape to the production area, before making their way out to the vineyards beyond.

+ Folk Architects

+ Medhurst Winery

Via ArchDaily

Photography by Peter Bennetts