recycled materials, recycled plastic, t3arc, green architecture, mexico architecture, green footbridges, Alfredo Raymundo Cano Briceño, budget architecture

A stunning, modern, yet organic design, Cano’s work proves that beauty and innovative architecture can come on a budget. The new additions feature repurposed pine once used as framework in T3arc’s previous projects and a translucent exterior constructed with clear plastic panels retrieved from an industrial landfill.

By reevaluating the end use of these discarded materials, Cano’s choice of plastic panels not only proved to be economical, but the unique sheen created by the plastic amplified the surroundings as much as the interior. The clear panes which adorn both the sides and much of the roof infuse the interior bridge with natural light, while views of the forest are maximized without obstructing the natural order of the site. The bridge has very much become an extension of the forest.

recycled materials, recycled plastic, t3arc, green architecture, mexico architecture, green footbridges, Alfredo Raymundo Cano Briceño, budget architecture

Angled pine beams help support the bridge, and follow the diagonal lines of the 1,300-square-foot two-story main house. “The irregularity of the site allowed us to connect the addition to the second floor of the house, where the main room is,” Cano tells Dwell. “The layout is very simple; from the bridge you enter to a small lobby that connects you to the three bedroom doors, with the bathroom between the bedrooms.”

The design continues to make the best of local conditions through small windows which puncture one side of the addition that can better regulate cold north winds and ventilation during the changing seasons. The windows also give way to a better connection for the kids to the main structure, where their parents are. To protect the addition from humidity, the constructions were completely clad it in recycled plastic panels.

+ T3Arc

Via Dwell