We doze off on public transportation 27 times a year, according to James Cox, CEO of the UK-based sleep brand Simba. So they came up with a more comfortable alternative: the Simba Snoozeliner, a bus with 14 sleep pods outfitted with Simba mattresses, noise-canceling headphones, and liver-cleansing milk thistle. It even has a steward on hand to wake people up at their stop.


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Shift workers or late night partiers could hitch a ride and take a nap on the double decker Simba Snoozeliner, designed in collaboration with Andersson-Wood Architects. Each sleeping pod on the night bus would be equipped with a Simba Hybrid Mattress, a duvet and pillow, and eye mask. Travelers could really get cozy after taking off shoes and coats – there’s storage aboard for those, as well as valuables.

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Other amenities seem to be targeted at those who may have had a tad too much alcohol, including free mineral water and revitalizer kits with milk thistle and vitamin C. Scent infusions aimed at inducing sleep or busting hangovers are also available in each booth, and travelers can buy smoothies or coffee. Living walls with peace lilies, Boston ferns, and snake plants inside the bus will also lend to a tranquil atmosphere.

Simba, Snoozeliner, Simba Snoozeliner, Andersson-Wood Architects, night bus, sleeping pods, bus, public transportation

All this might sound like a dream come true, but Timeout London pointed out a few downsides: for one, there might not really be enough time between embarking and disembarking for travelers to really get a good sleep. They also wonder what would stop the Snoozeliner from becoming a big party bus. Simba pointed out in their press release many people are nervous about riding on public transportation at night: three in five worry about encountering antisocial or drunken behavior, and two in five are afraid they’ll be the victim of a crime.

There’s the question of if the buses will ever really hit the roads at all. Cox said in the statement, “We know that there will be lots of red tape to wade through, but are looking forward to firming up meetings with local authorities in the New Year.”

Simba aims to launch their service in fall of next year, offering trips starting at £8.50, or around $11, and want the buses to run on eight routes in four cities across the UK.

+ Simba

+ Andersson-Wood Architects

Images courtesy of Simba