Soaring ceilings and natural light define the Iron Maiden House, a contemporary home that pays tribute to the local site context in Sydney’s lower North Shore. Designed by Darlington-based CplusC Architectural Workshop, the Iron Maiden House was created for a family of five and offers generously sized rooms that spill out to outdoor-facing areas. The dwelling’s asymmetrical mountain-like forms mimic the appearance of a natural gorge and even feature a series of linear ponds that cut lengthwise through the center of the home.


outdoor exterior view

main bedroom

Covering an area of 3,089 square feet, the Iron Maiden House consists of metal-clad angular volumes that the architects describe as their modern take on the gable houses typically found throughout the region. A solar study determined the orientation as well as the overall layout of the home to fill the interior with natural light. Meanwhile, the architects also added flowering creeping plants to the exterior for seasonal variation and to heighten the home’s likeness to a natural gorge.

outdoor walkway

creeping vines on outside

The interiors feature cathedral-like spaces with tall ceilings and white walls. Massive walls of glass and the ponds that bisect the house bring the outdoors in. The main living spaces—which also flow from indoors to out—as well as a guest en-suite bedroom, study and swimming pool are located on the ground floor while the master suite, a lounge and three additional bedrooms can be found upstairs.

living area

glass louvers and windows

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“The home aims to elevate everyday activities,” note the architects. “Occupants are encouraged to pause and enjoy the view through a large window near the spiral stair and generous stair treads which meet nearby walls, forming a place to sit. Each room has a view through green space into different parts of the house. The sophisticated use of levels within the home creates distinct yet akin spaces.” The Iron Maiden House was also shortlisted in the 2018 World Architecture Festival and Houses Awards.

+ CplusC Architectural Workshop

Via ArchDaily

Images by Murray Fredericks and Michael Lassman